A guiding light

A guiding light
Submitted

A “suspicious” mammogram led to an ultrasound, which led to two biopsies, a cancer diagnosis, partial mastectomy, chemo and targeted radiation. While the diagnosis was devastating, Ogden was grateful that she could stay local for treatment.

                        

For Diana Ogden it wasn’t so much “if” she would get breast cancer, it was more a case of “when.” Ogden, of New Pittsburgh, watched her mother and two aunts battle the disease and figured it was just a matter of time until it was her turn. As it worked out, in June of 2017, it was her turn.

Ogden remembers the process well. A “suspicious” mammogram led to an ultrasound, which led to two biopsies, a cancer diagnosis, partial mastectomy, chemo and targeted radiation. While the diagnosis was devastating, Ogden was grateful that she could stay local for treatment.

“I was able to do everything locally,” said Ogden. “From the screenings to diagnosis and treatment, I was never more than 15 minutes away from where I needed to be.”

Not only did this curb the anxiety level at a very stressful time, it allowed her to continue working at the Wayne County Auditor’s Office for much of the time, babysit her four grandchildren when she felt up to it and relieve the pressure on family members to get her where she needed to be.

Ogden was treated at the Wooster Cancer Care a Wooster Community Hospital (WCH) Health System practice – an affiliation with The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James).

She was fortunate enough to be one of the first to receive prone radiation while lying on her stomach. This new technology keeps radiation away from the heart and lungs.

Even though Ogden watched her mother survive cancer 20 years ago, the diagnosis was still “terrifying.” Her first question to Dr. Tamera Robotham, general surgeon at WCH, was, “Is this curable?” Dr. Robotham’s reassuring response was affirmative. Still “chemo is such an unknown,” said Ogden. “You never know what it will do to you.”

It turns out it just made Ogden really tired. While she fought a bit of nausea, it wasn’t that bad, she said. “As much as possible, I strove for normalcy.”

This included eventually getting a wig. “I started by just wearing scarves,” Ogden said. But soon tired of styling with a scarf and off she went to Sheer Professionals with her boss and co-worker to pick out a wig.

For Ogden, age 54, she completed chemo, radiation and herceptin treatments. Her hair has grown back in and she is sporting a new cut. Her energy level is coming back and this past summer she was able to “plant a garden and pull weeds instead of watch them grow.” In her words, “Life is good.”

While the past year wasn’t easy, she has seen blessings along the way. Co-workers and family were a huge support and Ogden can’t say enough positive about her cancer care team, Drs. Prah, Walston and the nursing staff. Dr. Robotham was “awesome,” said Ogden. “She took her time with me and answered all my questions. She insisted on a second biopsy when the first one came back negative. She probably saved my life.”

The oncology team at WCH earned Ogden’s complete trust as well. “I went in terrified and broke down at first but they were wonderful. They were so kind and reassuring and eventually became like family. I came to know all about them and they soon knew all about my grandkids,” she said.

“At WCH I never felt like a number,” said Ogden. “Someone was always there to guide me through the process. I’m so grateful they were close by.”

Wooster Community Hospital Health System is located at 1761 Beall Ave. in Wooster. For more information about Wooster Cancer Care at Wooster Community Hospital Health, visit WoosterHospital.org.


Loading next article...

End of content

No more pages to load