Being healthy is important for hunters

Being healthy is important for hunters
                        

Just got home from the Holmes County Fair to sit down and write to y’all. It never ceases to amaze me how much time and effort it takes to bring this event to life. The young’uns take care of their animals year round in preparation for the big day.

The great people on the fair board and Harvest Ridge are to be commended for their efforts, as well as the volunteers who donate their time to assure everything goes well, and the parents, patience personified in supporting their children to learn responsibility and hard work.

I’ve been at both ends: FFA and 4H in my youth and our kids learned from their projects as well. Thank you all.

Speaking of our children, I get to brag a little as our oldest daughter participated in the Pelotonia bike marathon, raising donations for the James Cancer Center Aug. 3-4 with over 8,000 bikers who left Columbus Saturday morning.

Jena biked 100 miles on Saturday night, stayed overnight at Kenyon College and biked 80 miles Sunday morning, ending at Bevelhymer Park near New Albany. She had been training for several months.

Great job everyone. Pelotonia raises millions of dollars each year for cancer research.

Continuing on with our preparation for our next safari in South Africa, you might ask why, because it’s still just over a year until we go, would you begin to prepare now?

There are many answers to that question, as there are many factors involved. Probably first and foremost is our health. As we are both over 60 years old now, it’s not as easy as it used to be to get into and/or stay in shape.

You young pups wolf down the calories and run 2 miles or bike 20 miles and that’s OK. While we, the older generation, sneak a cookie (or three) and have to ride our stationary bikes for 10 minutes or hike to the top of the stairs to burn it off.

But being in good shape is definitely a plus over there. Of course most outfitters will tailor your hunt according to your abilities. Most of our hunting on our first safari was done on a hunter’s rack in the back of a small Toyota. But we still did some hiking to stalk within range. It’s not like the animals walk up to you and ask you to take a picture, although we did have one rhinoceros bull within 15 feet of the truck.

Good health also will help you fend off any disease you might be exposed to over there. You should seek a list of what vaccinations your area requires before you go. Our area required a Hep A at least six months before, followed by Hep B, typhoid shots and malaria meds, just to be safe.

Make sure your guides know of any handicap or injury that might affect your abilities over there. Get injury insurance in case, God forbid, something happens that you would have to be air-lifted out of the bush. This can really be expensive. Check with your own insurance company to see if they handle a policy like that. I did, and it was a lot cheaper than those companies they advertise on the hunting shows.

Make sure you take plenty of your prescription meds along. It isn’t like you can just stop at the pharmacy on the corner (there are no corners). Air travel can be long, so if you have trouble sleeping, it can be even longer. Take along some sleeping pills but check with your doctor first. We’re just getting started, but before we go, I did want to tell you about our upcoming youth hunt in October.

As you may have heard, we began a new group called the Whitetail Heritage of Ohio (WHOO), and we will be, once again, hosting 15 young hunters at the David Troyer residence in Walhonding on Saturday, Oct. 5. This is for young beginners who want to learn or a handicapped hunter who might not have access to hunting equipment and needs someone to teach them.

The application and contact info can be found on our Facebook page, Whitetail Heritage of Ohio. The application deadline is Sept. 7. We are looking forward to helping these young people learn.

God gave us this body for us to take care of. No matter what size, color or gender, we were created in his image. Just like your car, truck or bike, it requires regular maintenance.

First Corinthians 6:19-20 tells us our body is God’s temple and not our own. You are special in his eyes.

God bless.


Loading next article...

End of content

No more pages to load